Configuring JMS destination

Creating new Queues and Topics using the Web console is even more simple. From the Profile menu, select the Messaging provider option (1). The main panel will switch to the Messaging canvas. From there, select the JMS Destinations tab (2), and the resource you want to create (Queue or Topic) (3). Then, hit the Add button (4) to create
a new one:


For example, if you need to create a new Queue, all you have to do is complete the next simple dialog box, which is shown below:


When you hit Save, the new JMS resource will be enlisted in the JMS sub-system panel (and as well persisted in the main configuration file).


Configuring Socket Binding groups

Changing the Socket Bindings of the application server can be used to solve port conflicts with other applications or even other instances of JBoss AS. If you are running in domain mode, the best thing you can do is specify a port offset for your servers, as pointed out in the Chapter 4, JBoss Web Server Configuration, which was all about
domain servers.

If, however, you are running in standalone mode and you have just to change one or more port address, than you might easily change it from the Web console.


Reach the Socket Binding groups (1) option, and select the Socket Binding you want to change, for example, the http server port (2). Then, click on the Edit button (3) and enter the new port value. When you are done, click on the Save button, which will be added in place of the Edit button.

Server restart needed?

Changing the Socket Binding groups does not produce the immediate effect of changing the server port. As a matter of fact the updated configuration must be reloaded by the AS; you could simply restart the application server or, even better, issue the :reload command from your friendly neighbourhood, the Command Line Interface.

CLI or Web console ?

Apparently, this is a pointless question. It’s a bit like asking which operating system is better; Linux or Windows. Both management interfaces are powerful instruments, and in some circumstances, one might be a better choice than another.

For example, the CLI provides a huge addition to the application server and with a relatively short amount of time, it will let you put your hands into every resource of the application server, including runtime metrics. Even more add-ons are planned to come in the very next releases of the application server.

On the other hand, the Web console provides a simple and elegant way to manage your AS resources with little or none learning curve. In particular, we have shown in Chapter 3, Managing the Enterprise Server, how it can be precious to manage the basic domain functionalities, such as configuring, starting, and stopping server groups and hosts.

Let’s examine the excellence of each instrument in a table:


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